I’ve been thinking about the movie The Goonies (1985) a lot lately. Sometimes you never know what you are going to find at the bottom of a well. Then, when things go from bad to worse, how does one keep moving forward if they feel like they are at a dead end at the bottom of a well?  It’s been a tough season for many and my brain is continually searching for word pictures and allegories to describe these difficult times. In The Goonies movie, each of the children is on a desperate journey to save their family’s homes. Some are operating in the reality of the pain of the situation, but several have hope based on their belief system of the world. The children are continually arguing as circumstances go from bad to worse. They come to a point in the movie when it feels easy to just surrender to the evil forces because their situation was hopeless and they had no will to fight anymore. However, an unexpected power of good shows up and saves the day. It was one of my favorite movies as a teen and I remember seeing it several times in the movie theater.  Believe it or not, there was a movie theater near my college that showed movies for a dollar on certain days of the week (yes, I am old). In my teen years, I found the film amusing. In my adult years, I see the spiritual and emotional allegories to all movies because counselors are always trying to understand people’s stories on a deeper level.

Do you feel like you are at the bottom of a well?  Does it feel like the water source you were drinking from is running dry? What do you do when you feel like your resources are shrinking and you feel trapped in a situation?  I remember a phase of my life when I started saying “I hate my life” a lot. I felt caught in a series of unfortunate powerless situations, and I began stating my dislike for my position over and over. The end result was more powerlessness, less creative thinking and little ability to see the positive in my life. Remember the Goonies movie? The creative thinkers were those who were not overwhelmed with their life situation because of the hope they had, and in turn, they could think outside of the box.  

In the dark seasons, it is essential that you stir up your faith; not by living in a fantasy or relying on the hope of others because neither of these will sustain you. You must force yourself to operate in gratitude for what you do have. I use daily gratitude journaling and push myself to talk about what is right. There is a story in the Bible where two powerful fathers of the faith were arrested and imprisoned. Paul and Silas were at their end. They were at the bottom of the well and there were no resources to draw from. One of the few freedoms they had was their mouth and they began to sing. I assume the songs from their mouths were songs of and about God and what he had done much like those sung today when I visit a temple with my Jewish friends.  As they were singing, the very prison foundations were rocked by an earthquake and the prison crumbled to the ground. They walked out as free men. Your freedom from your prison or the bottom of a well comes from what you are singing about, speaking about and declaring over yourself and your situation. What is the song in your head? Break the foundations of your prison or your well. There are treasures of hope, creativity and empowerment to be found.